Introduction
Unit 1- Child and Young Person Development
Unit 2 Safeguarding the welfare of children and young people
Interactive Content Students can manually mark this item complete: Safeguarding word-search Unit 3 Communication and Professional Relationships with Children, Young People and Adults
Unit 4 Equality, Diversity and Inclusion in Work with Children and Young People
Unit 5 Schools as organisations

Unit 4 Equality Read Material

Definitions

Creed: Any system of principles or beliefs.

Disability: The condition of being unable to perform as a consequence of physical or mental unfitness.

Discrimination: To treat one particular group of people less favourably than others because of their race, colour, nationality, or ethnic or national origin. The law in Britain recognises two kinds of racial discrimination: direct and indirect. Direct discrimination occurs when race, colour, nationality, or ethnic or national origin is used as an explicit reason for discriminating. Indirect discrimination occurs when there are rules, regulations, or procedures operating, which have the effect of discriminating against certain groups of people. This may happen in subtle ways. For example, the staff at a shop in Blackburn had to wear a uniform skirt, but an Asian woman worker refused for religious reasons. A tribunal found the shop guilty of indirect discrimination because a large number of Asian women would not be able to comply with the rule.

Diversity: The concept of diversity encompasses acceptance and respect. It means understanding that each individual is unique, and recognizing our individual differences. These can be along the dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, or other ideologies. It is the exploration of these differences in a safe, positive, and nurturing environment. It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerance to embracing and celebrating the rich dimensions of diversity contained within each individual.

Equality: The principle by which all persons or things under consideration are treated in the same way.

Heterosexual: Sexually oriented to persons of the opposite sex.

Homophobia: prejudice against (fear or dislike of) homosexual people and homosexuality.

Inclusion: The act of being included or the state of being included.

Inclusive Provision: Inclusion is about a disabled person or young disabled person’s right to be part of mainstream provision. To be valued for whom they are, and provided with the support that they need to be a part of that provision.

Oppression: Oppression is the term used to convey the systematic mistreatment of certain groups’ experiences. The word ‘oppressed’ is performed to describe the condition of people, who are regularly discriminated against and abused in access to housing, education, health care, employment, etc.

Participation: The act of sharing or taking part in the activities of a group.

Prejudice: A prejudice is a preconceived belief, opinion, or judgment toward a group of people or a single person because of race, social class, and gender.

Racism: The prejudice that members of one race are intrinsically superior to members of other races. Discriminatory or abusive behaviour towards members of another race

Sexism: Discriminatory or abusive behaviour towards members of the opposite sex.

Stereotype Classifying people because of one unique characteristic. Stereotyping is a form of prejudice that can form damaging images of people because of a particular characteristic (e.g. the way someone looks, their age) without having any knowledge of the person.

Discrimination

Direct discrimination: To treat one particular group of people less favourably than others because of their race, colour, nationality, or ethnic or national origin. The law in Britain recognises two kinds of racial discrimination: direct and indirect. Direct discrimination occurs when race, colour, nationality, or ethnic or national origin is used as an explicit reason for discriminating.

Indirect discrimination occurs when there are rules, regulations, or procedures operating, which have the effect of discriminating against certain groups of people. This may happen in subtle ways. For example, the staff at a shop in Blackburn had to wear a uniform skirt, but an Asian woman worker refused for religious reasons. A tribunal found the shop guilty of indirect discrimination because a large number of Asian women would not be able to comply with the rule.

Victimisation – Employment context: –

Being unfairly singled out for the bad treatment of some kind. This is quite likely to be illegal either because of the grounds chosen to single you out (for example because of your race or because of your trade union activities) or because your employer owes you a general duty of care.

Harassment

This includes behaviour that is offensive, intimidating, bullying, or distressing. It can be intentional or unintentional. It may be related to individuals but can be part of the general culture. It is commonly understood as behaviour intended to disturb or upset

Objective justification

This allows employers to set requirements that directly age discriminatory in exceptional circumstances and will require real evidence to support their case. If challenged, each case will be considered by a tribunal on its individual merit.

What do organisations have to do: Organisations should ensure that new legislation is included in their Equality policy. Equality Policy should be revisited from time to time to ensure it has not become outdated, to test any new employment policies and procedures for discrimination, and to ensure the policy itself meets current legislation requirements.

Staff need to be made aware (through training, notice boards, circulars, contracts of employment, etc.) that it is not only unacceptable to discriminate, harass or victimise someone on the grounds of religion or belief, etc., it is also unlawful. Organisations should also make clear that they will not tolerate such behaviour. Staff should know what to do if they believe they have been discriminated against or harassed, or if they believe someone else is being discriminated against or harassed, and this should be included in the grievance procedure. Organisations should ensure that their staffs understand that if they harass colleagues, they could be personally liable and may have to pay compensation themselves. Such liability is separate from and in addition to, any compensation that the organisation is ordered to pay. Workers saying no offense was intended will not constitute a defense. In addition, an absence of a complaint from the individual being harassed does not mean that harassment has not taken place. This covers workers visiting your premises.